Loading Photoshop
When you launch the overlay, the first thing it does is load Photoshop. The version it loads depends on what version(s) you have installed. If you have more than one, the program will ask you which you want to use. This choice is somewhat permanent, if you ever want to use a different version delete the file [Interop.Photoshop.dll] in the directory that houses the [Typesetterer.exe] program. And relaunch the program. Note: if you want to use Typesetterer with the 64-bit version of Photoshop, but you have both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions installed, you'll need to uninstall the 32-bit version. It's unfortunate, but there's no way that I'm aware of to choose a particular instance to launch.
The Overlay
After it's been loaded, the overlay will look something like this: I ended up making the overlay look similar to Photoshop's tool windows for a couple reasons. One, mainly, I'm not all that creative. And two, I felt it should look like it belongs as well as behave somewhat like Photoshop. Hopefully, I've managed to achieve that. The overlay is split into two tabs, the first one should be fairly familiar to users of the last version. It's important to note that you can pull the tabs apart. Since, for some projects you will want to be able to view both at the same time.
The Text Tab
  • The arrows to the left and right of [Page 1 of 5] navigate the list of PSDs.
  • The text entries in the middle let you know where you're at in the script. The box to the left of them gets a checkmark placed in it when that entrie's text has been entered.
  • The save disk icon in the bottom left corner causes the program to save and close the current PSD when you're moving to the next one.
  • The list icon below the minimize/close buttons lets you know what you can do with the tab, as well as listing the hotkeys.
The Text Hotkeys
  • F1 - If you're not entering text, this moves to the previous PSD in the list if there is one. If you are, it moves to the previous line of text.
  • F2 - If you're entering text, this writes the current line of text into the textbox.
  • F3 - If you're entering text, this stops it.
  • F4 - If you're not entering text, this moves to the next PSD in the list if there is one. If you are, it moves to the next line of text.
That should cover the text entering aspect of the overlay.
Text Styles
This is a new feature in this version of Typesetterer. Here's the styles tab with some example styles added:
Styles Tab Features
  • Clicking a style will apply it to the currently selected text layer in Photoshop.
  • The wrench icon in the bottom left allows you to load and save text styles. Ideally, you'd use this to manage styles for different projects.
  • The garbage can icon allows you to delete the currently selected style.
  • The turning-a-page icon allows you to add a new style.
  • Right-clicking a style brings up the option to edit it.
  • The list icon below the minimize/close buttons lets you know what you can do with the tab, as well as listing the hotkeys.
Styles Tab Hotkeys
  • F5 - reapplies the currently selected style to the currently selected text layer.
  • Numpad / - moves to the previous text style if there is one and applies it.
  • Numpad * - moves to the next text style if there is one and applies it.
  • Numpad + - increases the text size of the current text layer.
  • Numpad - - decreases the text size of the current text layer.
Adding a Text Style
Here's the add a style window:
  • Style Name - this is the text that shows up in the Style's tab list.
  • Font - this is the only option that's required.
  • The Rest - these options aren't applied by default. This is because there are situations where you don't want certain things to override what you have set already. To enable a particular option, click the icon. What they do should be obvious.
Wrapping Up
That should cover most of Typesetterer's aspects. Hopefully, it's pretty simple and straightforward to use, while still saving you time.